August 1, 2011

Spirit Lake And Fort Bridger

This was a whirlwind trip that took me to some places I've never been to before. I picked up my brother and nephew and headed out on the 3 hour drive to Spirit lake in the High Uinta mountain range of Utah. It was a fun drive and we saw lots of Antelope along the way and even a bull moose. We started out fishing the stream below the lake and we couldn't keep the fish off the line. We were flyfishing using elk hair caddis and renegade's. While fishing the small stream we caught rainbows, cutthroat, brook and tiger trout! I even took a swim after a log jam I was standing on gave way. Everyone had a good laugh and the water was actually quite nice!
After an hour on the stream we headed up to the lake to see what we could catch. This time we pulled out our spinning rods and went to work. It was a matter of minutes before Justing had a tiger on his panther martin and giving him a good fight. I put on a jointed rapala and so had one of my own. It was gang busters the rest of the time on the rapapla. My nephew was also able to land one. You know its a great day when you get bored of catching fish. We called it a day and headed back down the mountain.
On the way back we stopped and toook a tour of historic Fort Bridger. What an interesting place. For a history on Fort Bridger, check out http://www.wyomingtourism.org/overview/Fort-Bridger-State-Historic-Site/31823. This fort was instrumental in the successful passage of countless pioneers traveling though out the west as well as my home state. On Labor Day weekend they have a huge mountain man rendezvous. If you're ever in the area, it's definately worth a vistit.




One of the many spectacular views along the way.
Spirit Lake


Cutthroat trout from the stream

Tiger trout from the stream.

Justins first ever tiger trout.

Brookie from the stream.

Spirit lake tiger.

Great catch buddy!




The general store to the right and first school house in Wyoming in the background.

A replica of the original fort.

replica of the original trading post.

Jim Bridger was a black smith and fur trader.

What's left of the orignal Mormon wall.

A few Jim Bridger artifacts.

Once the fort was turned over to the military, there were barracks and quarters all over.

2 comments:

  1. Hi, Rick. Enjoyed this post about another fine fishing day. Man, I would love me some Tiger Trout fishing. Thanks for sharing the pictures of not only the fishing success, but also, Fort Bridger.

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  2. You're more than welcome to come down Mel. You will most definately get some. I think Tigers are like snowflakes... No 2 fish are the same!

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